ikike

Ikike is the fundamental vehicle for the attainment of the change HOMEF seeks to build by creating spaces for knowledge creation, interrogation and sharing.

After a long and hard search for concepts that best capture our learning spaces, we settled on the word IKIKE. This word has important meanings in two Nigerian/African Languages.

In Ibibio, it means listen, reasoning power, common sense and intellect.

In Igbo, it has multiple meanings including rights, authoritative, capability and jurisdiction.

In resolving to call our knowledge space Ikike, we anchor on reasoning power, intellect and rights. 

Ikike is thus the umbrella word for our Sustain-Ability Academy, School of Ecology, Community Dialogues and our occasional Conversations.

 

Sustain-Ability Academy

We call this our Sustain-Ability Academy because the aim is to build human abilities to sustain our biodiversity, livelihoods and intergenerational justice. The Academy provides us a space where we invite one instigator (speaker) at a time to interrogate one vital contemporary issue holistically and in some detail. It is convened in the form of a lecture, but not in the ordinary sense because the instigator must also be open to learning from participants. Each academy session which is usually a one-day event is hosted as a multi-locational event with the same instigator speaking at each location. Usually the sessions are arranged to ensure that the instigator addresses:

  • Community people
  • Primary and secondary school pupils
  • Staff and students in tertiary institutions
  • Policy makers

Each Instigator afterwards becomes a Fellow of the HOMEF Sustain-Ability Academy. The Fellows provide a ready pool of knowledge that we can draw from whenever their expertise, knowledge and wisdom is needed. Through the academies, HOMEF connects peoples and shares knowledge and ideas. These academies help build a movement for ecological defense.

The Sustain-Ability Academy was formally called Home School and the first sessions held in 2013 in Benin City, Lagos and Abuja. We have addressed topics in several areas including Climate Change Crisis, Food Crisis, Gender Justice, Biodiversity, Earth Democracy, Health, Labour and Extractivism. Our speakers are drawn from all parts of the world.

Sustain-Ability Academy

We call this our Sustain-Ability Academy because the aim is to build human abilities to sustain our biodiversity, livelihoods and intergenerational justice. The Academy provides us a space where we invite one instigator (speaker) at a time to interrogate one vital contemporary issue holistically and in some detail. It is convened in the form of a lecture, but not in the ordinary sense because the instigator must also be open to learning from participants. Each academy session which is usually a one-day event is hosted as a multi-locational event with the same instigator speaking at each location. Usually the sessions are arranged to ensure that the instigator addresses:

  • Community people
  • Primary and secondary school pupils
  • Staff and students in tertiary institutions
  • Policy makers

Each Instigator afterwards becomes a Fellow of the HOMEF Sustain-Ability Academy. The Fellows provide a ready pool of knowledge that we can draw from whenever their expertise, knowledge and wisdom is needed. Through the academies, HOMEF connects peoples and shares knowledge and ideas. These academies help build a movement for ecological defense.

The Sustain-Ability Academy was formally called Home School and the first sessions held in 2013 in Benin City, Lagos and Abuja. We have addressed topics in several areas including Climate Change Crisis, Food Crisis, Gender Justice, Biodiversity, Earth Democracy, Health, Labour and Extractivism. Our speakers are drawn from all parts of the world.

School of Ecology

The School of Ecology (SoE) is a vital part of HOMEF’s IKIKE, a knowledge space for the interrogation of concepts, policies and actions on various issues, ranging from environmental/climate justice, agriculture, re-source democracy and overall socio-ecological transformation. Our SoEs are central to our efforts to build participants’ reasoning power, intellect and rights.

The school challenges mindsets and points at alternatives aimed at building wellbeing without harming our planet, other species and peoples.

The school aims at:

  • Influencing discourse on pathways to wellbeing, justice and inclusive progress
  • Building and sharing capacities towards advocacy for policies in favour of a justice-based transition from polluting pathways and over-consumption of resources.
  • Promoting the rights of Mother Earth, biodiversity-based economies and the respect of traditional knowledge and wisdom
  • Building solidarity, and supporting networks of individuals, communities and organizations in the quest for socio-ecological justice.
  • Exposing false solutions especially in the areas of technofixes, climate change and food production
  • Dismantling coloniality and mindsets that drive towards destructive transformation of Nature and
  • Providing a safe learning space

The School of Ecology started in 2018 with its first session in Benin city, Nigeria. At present, the school is not a physical structure. Location of each session is chosen based on its  relationship to the topic at hand and the current need/challenges in any city or community. Topics covered so far include Life after oil, Climate justice, Eco-colonialism, Emerging Technologies and implications for Africa, etc.

Our target scholars are youths with a mix of older people in government and private sector who can help effect the change we seek. Participants are selected based on expertise, interest and a commitment to learn and contribute significantly to the subject/issue of focus.  Each session which usually lasts for 2 days or more features multiple instigators/speakers to allow for in-depth interrogation of the subject at hand.  They are professionals drawn from all parts of the world

Community Dialogues

The Community Dialogues (CD) are diagnostic gatherings that provide space for community members to review the environmental/ecological situation in their communities and to identify needed areas of action to preserve /defend their heritage. The Community Dialogues are spaces where the expertise lies with the community while HOMEF team members are the learners. They are spaces for sharing knowledge/competence in environmental monitoring for ecological defense. Resolutions and outputs from these dialogues are used to draw the attention of relevant authorities to the highlighted needs/challenges of the communities.

A CD can be for one community or a cluster of communities can also hold it jointly. Although the major focus is on rural communities, the CD is suitable for all communities irrespective of whether they are urban or rural. They would equally work for workplace, schools and other specialized communities.

The CD is a two‐stages exercise:

  1. Stage one: Dialogue
  • Identify assets by reviewing the ecological history of the community and comparing that with the present situation.
  • Identify changes that have occurred as well as the causative factors (human, corporate, etc.)
  • Prioritize areas that require actions
  • Advocate for remediation, conservation or protection
  1. Stage two: Training
  • Conduct trainings for ecological monitoring skills
  • Set up Community Eco-Defenders and Action Committees
  • Actively monitor, report and take necessary actions

The Dialogues are framed in a way that they address the major environmental and livelihood threats faced by the communities. We run Community Dialogues for:

  • Oil field communities – Focusing on pollution and impacts of fossil fuel exploration and exploitation.
  • Fishers – our FishNotOil campaign and FishNet Alliance undertake this.
  • Forest dependent communities – Against harmful infrastructural projects and forest conversion without prior informed consent.
  • Farmers – Promoting food sovereignty, agroecology and opposing genetic engineering of food crops and animals.
  • Mining communities – in collaboration with Yes to Life, No to Mining. This focuses on impacts of mining on communities and peoples.
Community Dialogues

The Community Dialogues (CD) are diagnostic gatherings that provide space for community members to review the environmental/ecological situation in their communities and to identify needed areas of action to preserve /defend their heritage. The Community Dialogues are spaces where the expertise lies with the community while HOMEF team members are the learners. They are spaces for sharing knowledge/competence in environmental monitoring for ecological defense. Resolutions and outputs from these dialogues are used to draw the attention of relevant authorities to the highlighted needs/challenges of the communities.

A CD can be for one community or a cluster of communities can also hold it jointly. Although the major focus is on rural communities, the CD is suitable for all communities irrespective of whether they are urban or rural. They would equally work for workplace, schools and other specialized communities.

The CD is a two‐stages exercise:

  1. Stage one: Dialogue
  • Identify assets by reviewing the ecological history of the community and comparing that with the present situation.
  • Identify changes that have occurred as well as the causative factors (human, corporate, etc.)
  • Prioritize areas that require actions
  • Advocate for remediation, conservation or protection
  1. Stage two: Training
  • Conduct trainings for ecological monitoring skills
  • Set up Community Eco-Defenders and Action Committees
  • Actively monitor, report and take necessary actions

The Dialogues are framed in a way that they address the major environmental and livelihood threats faced by the communities. We run Community Dialogues for:

  • Oil field communities – Focusing on pollution and impacts of fossil fuel exploration and exploitation.
  • Fishers – our FishNotOil campaign and FishNet Alliance undertake this.
  • Forest dependent communities – Against harmful infrastructural projects and forest conversion without prior informed consent.
  • Farmers – Promoting food sovereignty, agroecology and opposing genetic engineering of food crops and animals.
  • Mining communities – in collaboration with Yes to Life, No to Mining. This focuses on impacts of mining on communities and peoples.
Conversations

Conversations” is part of our learning spaces and  it creates an avenue for participants to learn and share ideas from the lives and resources of reputable thinkers, environmental justice and human rights activists (past and present) in the quest for justice and radical socio-economic transformation.

We aim to ensure that young activists learn from history, passion, dedication, sacrificial struggle of older activists while basing their current struggles and fights for justice on grounded knowledge and carefully thought out plans and analyses. 

Conversations started in 2019 with the first session featuring Ken Saro-Wiwa using his book, Silence would be Treason as the anchor. Conversations expose participants to the minds and materials from people like Amilcar Cabral, Claude Ake, Martin Luther King Jr, Malcom X, Mahatma Gandhi, Nelson Mandela, Leymah Gbowee, Steve Biko, Frantz Fanon, Walter Rodney, Chinweizu and others.

Participants in the Conversations usually include young activists, community persons and social justice campaigners. We hold at least 2 Conversations per year.

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